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Highly Accessed Correspondence

Implementing a successful data-management framework: the UK10K managed access model

Dawn Muddyman1*, Carol Smee1, Heather Griffin2, Jane Kaye2 and the UK10K Project3

Author Affiliations

1 The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK

2 Centre for Health, Law and Emerging Technologies (HeLEX), Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus, Oxford OX3 7LF, UK

3 The UK10K Project

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Genome Medicine 2013, 5:100  doi:10.1186/gm504

Published: 15 November 2013

Abstract

This paper outlines the history behind open access principles and describes the development of a managed access data-sharing process for the UK10K Project, currently Britain’s largest genomic sequencing consortium (2010 to 2013). Funded by the Wellcome Trust, the purpose of UK10K was two-fold: to investigate how low-frequency and rare genetic variants contribute to human disease, and to provide an enduring data resource for future research into human genetics. In this paper, we discuss the challenge of reconciling data-sharing principles with the practicalities of delivering a sequencing project of UK10K’s scope and magnitude. We describe the development of a sustainable, easy-to-use managed access system that allowed rapid access to UK10K data, while protecting the interests of participants and data generators alike. Specifically, we focus in depth on the three key issues that emerge in the data pipeline: study recruitment, data release and data access.